Stand up and be quiet

One of the greatest proofs for the obvious existence of God to an honest conscience, is the length, width, height, and depth people travel to dismiss Him.  This is indisputably true.

Image result for who me?

Then there is always the word of God which indicts and stops every mouth:

But I am a good person……shut up

But I am a learned scientist….shut up

But there is absolutely no proof….shut up

But all religious people are hypocrites….shut up

Image result for who me?

But I have interviewed all the great scholars….shut up

But the word of God was written by raving madmen…shut up

But nature serves absolutely no evidence for a creator….shut up

The testimony of the human conscience proves all men as having no excuse. Nature testifies to the conscience as well,  and God’s word silences every mouth, while confirming nature, the conscience, and predicting mans reaction to a holy God, which is pretty much a sad state of affairs.

It is a very good thing to hear the words ‘shut up’ by God.  He is the great I am,  and we have no argument before Him. It is time to stand up, be quiet, and admit that God is true, and every man is… well, that should be obvious.

Unto one the word of God is a savor unto life, and the same word is a savor of death unto others. Thus shall it ever be.  The choice is yours, but why would any body not choose life…

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About ColorStorm

Blending the colorful issues of life with the unapologetic truth of scripture.
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57 Responses to Stand up and be quiet

  1. Planting Potatoes says:

    very fun post – but so true! I often wonder why people who tell me that they don’t believe God exists, feel they have to work harder to prove their theory than I do – perhaps I don’t feel a need to prove anything? Favorite quote from C.S. Lewis: “I finally admitted God is God.”

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Well said!

    “But the word of God was written by raving madmen….”

    LOL! Ah, but just embrace the madness. It’s quite delightful, preferable even. Not quite sure why that is such a big fear, but it goes back to biblical times. What happens is that we cling so hard our own understanding and we’re not only often wrong, we’re not even being rational about it. They worried that Christ Himself had a demon, He can’t possibly be the messiah he wasn’t born in Bethlehem, how can anything good come from Nazareth, and on and on the rationalizations go and they sound quite smart at the time, but they are all just plain wrong. The truth is right there, right in front of us.

    Liked by 2 people

    • john zande says:

      Hi Insanity

      Out of interest, as your god can actually write, why didn’t it actually write the bible?

      God wrote on a wall: “Suddenly the fingers of a human hand appeared and wrote on the plaster of the wall, near the lampstand in the royal palace. The king watched the hand as it wrote.”
      — Daniel 5:5

      Curious to hear your answer….

      Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Yep, yep, yep yep yep, and did I say yep? We like ‘mad.’ Your friend ‘Jeremiah’ was considered such too eh?

      Then there is Paul, John the revelator, (there’s a mad max) our adulteress friends who sang a new tune, ha even you! Yep, mad to the bone. I like the company ib 😉

      Your last line is an invitation of of sorts, its there for the takin.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. archaeopteryx1 says:

    You can say “Shut up” til your camels come home, but you can’t silence the truth:

    “God is an ever receding pocket of scientific ignorance, that gets smaller and smaller as time goes by.”
    ~~ Neil Degrasse Tyson ~~

    Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Yea yea, yea, arch, that quote is borrowed and very small.

      A hundred years from today, your hero Tyson will be dead, his words stale and useless, and God will be God, and His word just as true as it is today.

      God’s word is forever settled in heaven.

      His quote is a perfect example of ‘vain and profane babblings.’

      Thank you for allowing me to speak well of He who created the camel.

      Like

      • archaeopteryx1 says:

        And your god will be a vague memory in the minds of Man.

        Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Yea ok sure, but it was one of your own who recently said man is no more relevant than an insect or animal. Hmmm.

          So at the grave-sight of the dearly departed, you would have to admit that this person being lowered into the ground has/had no more value than a common housefly. Ouch.

          Or are you saying man does have more worth than a housefly, and if so why? What are you basing this on?

          Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Or are you saying man does have more worth than a housefly” -To the universe at large, no – to each other, of course – we each bring meaning to those we touch as we pass through the world.

          As for the person being lowered into the ground, it is a decaying shell, indeed without meaning – the meaning lies in the memories of those left behind.

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Are you aware that ‘sleep’ is the premier for death?

          And do you ever wonder why it is that you even wake up from this sleep, since you have no control. You may want to consider WHO it is that owns all sleeping rights.

          ‘A dying shell, without meaning.’ That is about the saddest thing posted in quite some time.

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Actually sleep is an opportunity for our minds to reboot.
          And do you ever wonder why it is that you even wake up from this sleep, since you have no control.” – No, because having read more books than merely the Bible, I’m well aware that it’s all a question of chemical balance, serotonin vs melatonin. Melatonin makes us drowsy, serotonin, wide awake and alert – but then to you, that’s likely magic.

          Like

  4. thetruthisstrangerthanfiction says:

    “One of the greatest proofs for the obvious existence of God to an honest conscience, is the length, width, height, and depth people travel to dismiss Him. This is indisputably true”

    I’ll give that a hearty amen… 🙂 I mean, I don’t believe in Santa Claus being anything beyond a fictitious character, yet I don’t spend massive swaths of my life trying to convince other people that indeed I DON’T need to watch out, because he’s NOT making a list and checking it twice, and he’s CERTAINLY not going to determine if I’m naughty or nice!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • archaeopteryx1 says:

      On the other hand, you don’t have people running around, telling you that if you don’t believe in Santa Claus, you’re going to hell, and raising money from hard-working people to send missionaries to people of other cultures, to spread the same kind of fear and lies and pressure governments to allow governments to allow it to be taught in schools. If you did, I assure you, there would be those who would rise up to let the world know it isn’t true, but that wouldn’t make Santa any more real.

      Like

      • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction says:

        It’s interesting arch, because if what is being shared by missionaries is just as made up as Santa, then it shouldn’t be spreading any more “fear” than Santa tales do, because hell is just as much a fictitious cautionary device as the prospect of coal in your stocking…

        But, if the Bible is indeed true and heaven and hell and Judgment are all true, then telling people about Jesus isn’t to spread fear and lies, but the exact opposite.

        Either way, your reaction doesn’t make a lot of sense if the whole universe is just randomly evolving anyhow. This is what I have been trying to get you to see for some time now…

        Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          because hell is just as much a fictitious cautionary device as the prospect of coal in your stocking…” – You’re side-stepping, when presented by people trained to convince, the former fabrication can be made to seem real. And trust me, the coal-in-the-stocking fabrication can be made to seem quite real – one year, I actually placed a lump of coal in a child’s stocking as a prank, it had quite a therapeutic effect.

          Like

        • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction says:

          Yes well every metaphor obviously hss it’s limits. In the end, those who preach Christ as the answer to sin and hell are doing so because they are convinced they are real things, not for “therapeutic affect”. You can of course disagree, and not believe, but it makes little sense for you to not believe yet still feel infringed upon by other’s sincere beliefs and desire to show you the way OUT of condemnation, rather than condemn you. You don’t seem to realize how much you’re assuming that people believe in the bible basically because they find the doctrines of eternal death etc. to be so appealing… This is not the case for 99.999% of believers, and if u were to merely acknowledge this it would take so much of the indignation out of your disbelief…

          Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          not for ‘therapeutic affect’” – Of course it’s for therapeutic effect, if by that one means, as I did, behavior modification. You hang a carrot (eternal life) in front of a donkey, and punishment (everlasting hell) behind, and you get obedience. It doesn’t matter if the constructs are imaginary and can never be proven, as long as they’re believed to be real.

          Like

        • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction says:

          No wonder you have such an aversion to Christianity if what you understand it to be is such a twisted distortion…

          The funny thing is that I’m probably so much more in concert with you in terms of my own repulsion towards such legalistic manifestations, whether they be as what is found in Roman Catholicism or in Protestant circles.

          I guess the difference is that I have seen too much, and met too many persons who completely live the opposite of your own stereotypes, to lump it all together as all being the same. The Bible of course speaks of wolves in sheeps clothing, and so no one will deny that carrots and sticks are of course a methodology used by those who are aliens to true Grace. Jesus, however, does not fit into your cynical boxes, and points towards a renewal of the Heart, not mere outward behavioural modification…

          Liked by 1 person

        • ColorStorm says:

          Teo cents;

          You make a fair point truthisstranger @ having things in common to a degree, while at the same time not agreeing on things which are incontrovertible, ie, the essence of God, the person and work of Christ, and His word.

          Like

        • thetruthisstrangerthanfiction says:

          Indeed. Lumping all “religion” into a deplorably over-simplified straw-man in order to attack, instead of talking the time and energy to learn about the vast range of beliefs and applications therein, is not at all the path of truly seeking to understand.

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          He’s not out to understand anything, he’s out to get pats on the head – it takes a lot of poor self-esteem to need praise that badly, but then, he’s only following his god’s example.

          Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Pretty similar analogy about Mr Claus Truth; actually, that is real good. Tks for this. It is more than fair, and it does appear God’s word has the upper hand. 😉

      It is soooooooooooo hard to deny the silent but thunderous voice of conscience. CT covered it darn good too with his references.

      Like

  5. Pingback: An Honest Conscience While Doubting Gods | Amusing Nonsense

  6. Wally Fry says:

    Hey..good stuff

    You know my own journey to faith was pretty convoluted. I had so many of the same questions I see here every day. The game changer was when the implications of…..In the beginning…God…finally firmed up in my mind.

    Once the totality of the implications of that sunk into my dense skull I never looked back. Just sayin. He’s God and I’m not. Therefore it’s all good. He gets it His way, no prob.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Scarlett says:

    ““One of the greatest proofs for the obvious existence of God to an honest conscience, is the length, width, height, and depth people travel to dismiss Him.”

    Yea, that and the extent unbelievers go to detest me, persecute me, and/or tell me how uncomfortable it makes them when I talk about Jesus and the Bible,

    Liked by 1 person

    • ColorStorm says:

      Truth has that effect eh scarlett? Could be the truth about marriage as designed by God, but we do know there was One greater who has gone far lower than us; and that is a relief.

      But for goodness sake, how long will people hide from a Creator in his own creation…

      Liked by 1 person

    • archaeopteryx1 says:

      It’s not uncommon to feel discomfort when the delusional try to convince you their delusions are the truth. That’s probably why the movie, “Harvey” was so popular, people tended to shy away from Elwood P. Dowd when he tried to tell them of his friend, the invisible Pookah.

      Like

      • Scarlett says:

        Well Archie, it looks like Jesus is for me to know and you to find out. If you’d spend more time in seeking God instead of fighting Him you might just get to the place where you weren’t on the outside looking in.
        “He that hath my commandments, and keepeth them, he it is that loveth me: and he that loveth me shall be loved of my Father, and I will love him, and will manifest myself to him.” John 14:21
        See, this is the way it works, not what you’re pushing on us. There are some key words here; the word manifest is a biggie.

        Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          If you’d spend more time in seeking God instead of fighting Him you might just get to the place where you weren’t on the outside looking in.” – “Come, drink the Koolaid with us” – no thanks, I’ll pass on your shared delusions.

          Like

      • ColorStorm says:

        Arch-
        This post sailed right over your head.

        Only you could stand before the judge in the courtroom, where silence and respect is assumed, and you can’t keep your mouth shut, as you continually show disrespect to the court and ‘His honor.’

        That EVERY mouth may be stopped. Truth is, your mouth has been stopped with truth, yet, like the man in the courtroom, you go on and on and on.

        Yet God bears with you. That’s a judge worthy of all respect, as he does not send you away in cuffs.

        Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          This post sailed right over your head.” – Not at all, it came through loud and clear. What you fail to understand – well, just one of MANY things – is that your posts generate a kind of Rorschach test, and what you’ve clearly revealed in this one, is that you’d like to silence any opinions or evidence that disagrees with your belief, tolerating only confirmation bias.

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Ah no, its much simpler; may I refer you to CT’s excellent contributions as to the reality of the human conscience, and the obvious associations and consequences.

          How is it that you are troubled about this post, unless it reveals exactly what scripture declares?

          If I didn’t believe that Sakapookapokadis created all things, I’ll be darned if I would spend my whole life harrassing people who preached the gospel of Sakapookapokadis, spending all my waking hours trying to discredit all the writers of the gospel of Sakapookapokadis, and insulting every thing related to the false god of Sakapookapokadis. But you do not make the connection: Travelling great lengths to discredit…..

          Btw, I’ve not silenced you, and you know it. You have earned moderation.

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Ah, but you didn’t just stay here on your own blog, preaching the gospel of Sakapookapokadis and getting all of those warm, fuzzy pats on the head, without which you couldn’t function – had you done so, I would never have noticed one so insignificant, but you came to the blogsites of my friends, preaching the gospel of Sakapookapokadis, hence, I am here. We’ve already had this conversation once – early-onset Alzheimer’s?

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Strange arch, how you are complaining on behalf of your ‘friends,’ and of the millions of sites, how many ‘friends’ are you speaking of?

          Please re-read the first line of this post.

          Like

  8. “Who has directed the Spirit of the Lord, or as His counselor has informed Him? With whom did He consult and who gave Him understanding? And who taught Him in the path of justice and taught Him knowledge and informed Him of the way of understanding?” Isaiah 40:13, 14

    Not I, I am just going to shut up now!!!! Another great one, CS!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Citizen Tom says:

    For fun I visited siriusbizinus’ post (pingback from amusingnonsense above). siriusbizinus understands the irony. He can see he is doing exactly what this post says he would do, but he is doing anyway.

    I wonder if siriusbizinus ever read what C. S. Lewis wrote about the Moral Law.

    From “Mere Christianity.”

    We have two bits of evidence about the Somebody. One is the universe He has made. If we used that as our only clue, I think we should have to conclude that He was a great artist (for the universe is a very beautiful place), but also that He is quite merciless and no friend to man (for the universe is a very dangerous and terrifying place.) …The other bit of evidence is that Moral Law which He has put in our minds. And this is a better bit of evidence than the other, because it is inside information. You find out more about God from the Moral Law than from the universe in general just as you find out more about a man by listening to his conversation than by looking at a house he has built.

    From “The Case for Christianity.”

    The Moral Law isn’t any one instinct or any set of instincts: it is something which makes a kind of tune (the tune we call goodness or right conduct) by directing the instincts. (…) The most dangerous thing you can do is to take any one impulse of your own nature and set it up as the thing you ought to follow at all costs. There’s not one of them which won’t make us into devils if we set it up as an absolute guide. You might think love of humanity in general was safe, but it isn’t. If you leave out justice you’ll find yourself breaking agreements and faking evidence in trials ‘for the sake of humanity,’ and become in the end a cruel and treacherous man.

    We have a conscience given to us by God, but just as with everything else He has given us, we have the option of misusing His gift.

    Liked by 2 people

    • What you really ought to be asking yourself, Tom, is how I understand the irony. While I don’t want to take up CS’s space here discussing an outside post, I can say that I disagree with the reasoning expressed in the post.

      You’re more than welcome to respond to things that I write on my blog, as long as you can follow the rules.

      Like

      • Citizen Tom says:

        I read your post. Since ColorStorm’s post explains the irony, I don’t see how you could miss it. After I read your post, that is why I posted the C. S. Lewis quotes.

        What is a conscience? C. S. Lewis says God gives us a conscience. He calls it a Moral Law, and he argues that all men, whether they be Christian or not, believe in God or not, have a conscience.

        Let me add one more quote, this one from the Bible. It is from Romans. Paul said even the Gentiles have the Law in their hearts. He was a Jew, but this is what he wrote.

        Romans 2:12-16 English Standard Version (ESV)

        12 For all who have sinned without the law will also perish without the law, and all who have sinned under the law will be judged by the law. 13 For it is not the hearers of the law who are righteous before God, but the doers of the law who will be justified. 14 For when Gentiles, who do not have the law, by nature do what the law requires, they are a law to themselves, even though they do not have the law. 15 They show that the work of the law is written on their hearts, while their conscience also bears witness, and their conflicting thoughts accuse or even excuse them 16 on that day when, according to my gospel, God judges the secrets of men by Christ Jesus.

        When we sin, we receive our worst condemnation not from others, but from ourselves. That, of course, does not stop us from trying to shift the blame even for that condemnation to someone else. Didn’t the first sinners, Adam and Eve, do that? Didn’t Adam blame God for his disobedience?

        What we do with our conscience is up to each of us. Lewis says that a truly evil person has subverted his conscience. He no longer sees the evil he does as wrong. Instead, he calls what is evil good and what is good evil.

        As to posting my comments on your blog. Well, I thought these more appropriate here. I have also tried posting comments on your blog, and I have found the rules too arbitrary.

        Like

        • Well, I would disagree that Colorstorm is using this stuff ironically. But at its core is a message that is trying to tell people how to subvert their consciences and their intellects. To believe this message is to believe that Colorstorm or anyone knows what makes an honest conscience.

          You can quote more C.S. Lewis or the Bible, but it still doesn’t address the glaring issue that no one here is a mind reader.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          No irony? That’s funny. When I said you understood the irony, maybe I made a mistake.
          🙂
          Here is the definition of ironic.

          ironic
          adjective
          1. using words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning; containing or exemplifying irony :
          an ironic novel; an ironic remark.
          2.of, relating to, or tending to use irony or mockery; ironical.
          3.coincidental; unexpected:

          What is the irony? With the very words we use to deny our consciences, we proclaim the guilt we feel, guilt that comes from within, not without.

          Even though we each have to discover we have a conscience, we have an old story that tells us how it works. onsider how Adam and Eve

          Genesis 3:8-13 English Standard Version (ESV)

          8 And they heard the sound of the Lord God walking in the garden in the cool of the day, and the man and his wife hid themselves from the presence of the Lord God among the trees of the garden. 9 But the Lord God called to the man and said to him, “Where are you?” 10 And he said, “I heard the sound of you in the garden, and I was afraid, because I was naked, and I hid myself.” 11 He said, “Who told you that you were naked? Have you eaten of the tree of which I commanded you not to eat?” 12 The man said, “The woman whom you gave to be with me, she gave me fruit of the tree, and I ate.” 13 Then the Lord God said to the woman, “What is this that you have done?” The woman said, “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”

          Ashamed of their sin, Adam and Eve hid. Ashamed of their sin, both tried to shift the blame. But after we sin, there is only one solution. We must admit the sin, repent, and beg God to forgive us.

          Does this take a mind reader? No. Don’t we each have a conscience? You just said you have one. Don’t we talk about what our consciences say to us? Of course, we do. Our consciences protest too much not to be heard and eventually understood. That includes your own as well as mine.

          What the Bible tells is that God gave us the knowledge of good and evil. When we do evil, we feel the weight of that evil upon our consciences. Then, as men have men have always been tempted to do, we try to deny the import of what our consciences tell us. Because that is experience we all share, no mind reader is needed. What is needed is a savior, and that is why Jesus died on a cross.

          What ColorStorm neglected, because he cannot read your mind, is that you would blame him for disturbing your conscience. But I suppose we can forgive ColorStorm for that. The list of our excuses for ignoring our consciences is far to long for anyone to post.

          Like

        • I’m happy you found a definition of irony! You should read it. You’ll notice that incorrect logic is not an example of irony. It’s not even in the definition.

          I also think it’s great that you rhetorically ask, “Does this take a mind reader?” Other people reading this are going to see that, and then note that you suggest somehow people “deny the import of what our consciences tell us.” Even better, you suggest that I “would blame him for disturbing [my] conscience.”

          Suggesting you can’t read minds and then attempting to do so? That’s irony.

          Like

        • Citizen Tom says:

          @siriusbizinus

          No. Incorrect logic is not in the definition of irony, but when people make ironic excuses their logic is usually faulty. It is that fault logic that explains the irony.

          Still harping on mind reading. Apparently, even though you write a blog you have never given much thought about the process of communication.

          When we attempt to communicate with another person, we anticipate what they will think of our words. We try to think what their thoughts will be. Once we speak, the person hearing our words takes those words and tries to understand how we chose those particular words. They trying to think what were we thinking. The more important the words, the more we try read each others minds. Of course, we don’t read minds, but without that effort to empathize with each other, we would communicate more poorly than we do.

          So it is that when you redicule the effort we make to empathize with each other as “mind-reading,” it makes you look silly. We cannot rationally consider the viewpoint of another person? All you are saying is that we cannot. If that is the case, then what is the point of this debate?

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Seriously, sirius;
          You are making this overly complicated for yourself.

          There are bloggers (and you know this is true) who are professed atheists, and proud of it, ok, fine.

          Yet, the whole web sites focus on Christ, the bible, believers, Old testament, new testament, apostles, prophets, false teachers, popular doctrines, so called inconsistencies or errors in scripture. I could go on.

          What’s the point? Uh, line one of this post. It is plain bizarre for anybody to spend a lifetime trying to dismiss something that is irrelevant, mundane, impossible, meaningless, or whatever else.

          And what is the strength of this post? The argument for conscience as evidence that God is. No tricks, no ulterior motive. Nothing hidden or dark..

          Liked by 2 people

        • To the extent that commentary about my post is taking up space on your blog, I do apologize for that.

          The point for dismissing religious teachings is to show that they have no basis in whatever thought the person is promoting. People do it for different reasons. Personally, I do it to help others who are recovering from awful things that faith has done to them. I don’t view it as a crusade against Christianity, but rather as paying forward kindness that other bloggers gave me for helping me get out of the misery of unfounded belief.

          And while you suggest that your post is strong, I would have to say that it is strong in trying to keep people questioning their consciences. Because if they accept that maybe they are right, and that they are being true to themselves when they reject faith, then your post becomes a toothless lion.

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Commentary about your post taking up space? Ha, anytime Citizen Tom drops by to defend the faith is fine by me; if it is at your expense, that’s fine too.

          If ‘other’ bloggers helped you depart from the faith, maybe ‘other’ bloggers can help you return.

          Liked by 2 people

    • ColorStorm says:

      So glad you highlighted the conscience ct; there is a whole lot going on there that a blog will never do justice to.

      I think of the little girl with the cookie behind her back while mom asks her: ‘did you take the cookie?’ And will no previous teacher, and no experience in such a thing, she instinctively says ‘who me? nope,’ all the while she is troubled about doing ‘something wrong.’ Conscience, and knowledge of right and wrong. (moral law put in our minds as you say)

      Hiding something as if somebody does not see, it is the nature of man, and goes waaaay back, ‘Adam where are you?’ Who me? 😉

      But fortunately, God does not punish us for our shortcomings, but He surely appreciates it if we agree with His assessment of us.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. SLIMJIM says:

    Amen! It’s so true…people suppress the truth of God all the time; Romans 1 is such an insightful passage concerning man’s sinfulness, man’s motivation for false religions, etc.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Wally Fry says:

    They left? How’s that show it’s working out? That just shows they “left”. Whatever that means anyway. Truth is….if you are his…you can’t leave.

    Like

  12. uju says:

    Paul writes, “For the sake of the gospel I am in chains, but God’s word is not in chains.” Human understanding will fail, logic will be disputed and revised everyday and yet the truth that the knowledge of God inspires always remains unchanged.
    I dunno, but if madness is Christ, then madness has never been so appealing 😀

    I love God and he loves me. That love I can always always trust in.

    Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      That’s a popular theme too, ‘madness,’ as if it is a bad thing, when all we mean is ‘seriously interested’ in the things of God, and the truth of His word..

      Yep, give me a double dose of that madness.

      Like

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