Rise and shine

I’ll betcha so few farmers are non believers, as God has a soft spot for the salt of the earth. Farming is the epitome of man’s dominion over the earth shown in the care for livestock, the plowing of the earth, the reaping of the fruit of his hands at harvest, and a simple life of well, faith.

Image result for a bushel

Simple perhaps, as in a lack of extravagance, but not one devoid of riches. The often elusive sleep to so many is a reward to the farmer for a day well spent. It is up with the chickens as they announce a new dawn.

There are tractors to repair, auctions to attend, neighbors to help, roofs to patch, firewood to split, hay to bale, eggs and pumpkins to sell, corn cribs to fill, wounds to ignore, barns to mend, spouses to consider,  regulatory visits to deal with, post holes to dig, surveys to study, animals to feed, buildings to design, manure to spread, and yes, no time for the luxury of writing essays as there are coyotes to shoot so they do not eat another lamb.

After supper, there may be some time for reading the works of Plato, the adventures of Marco Polo, Shakespeare, or even the wisdom of the modern dance pioneer Isadora Duncan, and of course, the scriptures, to hold in context all of life. Most farmers are well read but keep their learning under their roof. I would think farmers rarely bother with profitless discussions of a Godless creation, yet do not turn away when opportunity knocks.

Farming is not for the lazy, yet many an industrious person does not work the fields. (There are just as many carpenters, pipefitters, roofers, nurse aides, electricians, painters, seamstresses, road workers, computer techs, and etc, who work from sun up to sun down and sleep rather well for labor that exhausted the body.) He giveth His beloved sleep.

Look at the hands of a man or woman farmer or tradesman, and I’ll show you a set of honest hands. Yes means yes, and no means no. The word is sure. His word is good as bread, as the saying goes, and we so much appreciate it when we can say to another, ‘he can be trusted.’ What a compliment in a society where many cannot be trusted.

The farmer plants seed by faith, and hopes the return is good, yet prepares if it is not. Farmers are prudent. Farmers are stewards of another mans property, for he knows the dirt is not really his. Farmers are wise.

The farmer knows that ‘by the voice of the Lord the hinds do calve,’ yet is ever ready to assist when the mother is struggling.  He is not afraid to speak of the majesty of the Lord, for he sees the hand of God in a thousand daily ways.

When driving through the countryside, I see acres and acres of tended land, and I thank God for the farmers of the earth. And by the way, all property owners and any person who works displays some kind of farming traits, for it all begins with rise and shine.

Lastly, I remember Joseph and his wise handling knowing the forecast of a seven year drought, and how he prepared with storage of the food. Some good farming there. And much more can be said about the ‘salt of the earth,’ as well as the light that should not be covered with a bushel, but that’s for another day.

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About ColorStorm

Blending the colorful issues of life with the unapologetic truth of scripture.
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61 Responses to Rise and shine

  1. archaeopteryx1 says:

    manure to spread” – No one does it better then you, CS —

    Like

    • ColorStorm says:

      Thank you for the compliment, as manure has tremendous value to the earth.

      Seriously arch, the post was an extolling of the farmer and labor, and somehow you just had to toss an insult.

      I’m thinking even your friends may be embarrassed.

      Liked by 2 people

      • LOL! Arch apparently has never been a farmer, because we call manure black gold. It’s the best way to get seeds to grow in barren land.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Wally Fry says:

          It’s funny you said that IB. Chicken farming is huge in this area, and we constantly smell chicken poop. We call it “Palmyra perfume”. But farmers buy it for farming use, so its good stuff.

          Liked by 2 people

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Actually, I/B, I spent a number of years as an award-winning landscape designer, and I’m well aware that manure is loaded with salt, which will kill plants if it is not first properly leached out. It is probably the least efficient of fertilizers, an the nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) content is quite low.

          Like

    • theancients says:

      only when one begins to remove the ‘dung’ from their lives and start using it as manure, will they begin to grow, mature and produce much fruit 🙂
      cheers

      Like

  2. Tricia says:

    Oh I could not agree with you more on the dignity of farmers and their affinity to how God works our world. Till, plant, harvest, reap, replenish and renew, it’s all part of the cycle of life that we ourselves and every other living thing goes through. The common sense values of farmers and other men and women who worked hard with their hands are what made this country great.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wally Fry says:

    Funny. About the time I came to know The Lord I also had a major change in career and began working with my hands, tools, outside…really for the first time. Hmm I wonder.

    Liked by 3 people

    • ColorStorm says:

      Well after all, he makes all things new 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • archaeopteryx1 says:

        Is Wally saying he was fired?

        Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Sounds like a choice to me, but I’m sure he will tell us if he’s inclined.

          But his response was germane……

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          “germane” – to –?

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Germane to the post arch, as he was relating his new career to farming, and working with his hands, etc.

          Like

        • Wally Fry says:

          Yes, Arch. I was fired. I suppose you can add that to the list of things that make me a boneheaded, cave dwelling, bronze age moron with a bad haircut.

          In fact, I was in the business of selling Home Mortgages. Wearing a suit and tie to work every day, sitting in offices behind a laptop. Economy struck, and one day I came in and was told we were scaling back…and good bye to me.

          I was a brand new believer too. Want some truth Arch? One of my first thoughts was..”Ok great, God, THIS is how you take care of your people?” Sure did have that thought. But He did take care of me. Missed one paycheck is all. And in Southeast Arkansas unemployment tends to last a while. One day, wearing a Suit, next day doing things I had no clue how to do in places I had never been. 8 years and I’ve never looked back.

          Lots of good stuff in this post Arch. If you read it with an open heart instead of a cynical one, you might get something. Honest labor done as if for God is an honorable thing, and working with andnear His creation helps you see it.

          Liked by 2 people

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          No labor is without honor, for the laborer brings his honor to the task.

          Liked by 1 person

        • Wally Fry says:

          Not bad arch. Not fully on board with that but not bad. Thanks

          Liked by 1 person

        • ColorStorm says:

          Yeah, I was thinking of the thieves who used jackhammers to break through and steal the vodka from the State Store, who sweated bullets for ten hours; certainly an example where the labor was not honorable.

          But for the most part, in labor there is profit, and the farmer is a fine example of honest industry.

          Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          I fully expected it to go over your head, you never disappoint.

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Sorry arch, but you made a statement that was not entirely true.

          You said ‘No’ labor is without honor, and I cited an example where there are many who engage in nefarious work.

          Once more, farmers are basically honest people who live and work with balanced scales.

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Not fully on board with that….” – If I thought you were, I’d be worried and start questioning my judgement.

          Like

        • Wally Fry says:

          Arch really.? What is the point of that? You basically just said any word from my mouth is wrong even if it agreed with you.

          Like

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          At least you get an “A” in consistency —

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          There ya go arch- you got more than your money’s worth with this answer by Wally.

          And did you notice the self deprecating remark about a haircut……….as a reminder……
          .
          And here you have one more chance to post a comment about Farming itself, rather than hit tennis balls off a wall back to yourself.

          Liked by 1 person

      • Wally Fry says:

        He do that for sure!

        Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          he makes all things new 😉” – Any idea when you think he could get around to my ’73 VW van? I could sure use a new wiring harness —

          Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Have you made one comment related to the farmer?

          And you wonder why some people are on the leash of moderation…….

          Like

    • Amen to that, Wally. I don’t know what it is, but there’s just something about being hands on and outdoors that brings us closer to God.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Wally Fry says:

        Agreed IB. When I live out west in Utah and Wyoming, I did a lot of trout fishing. Looking back, I wish I would have known God then. It was awesome even so…..but could have been even better. In fact, the Rocky Mountain West may have been God’s chance to show me He was really there and really did all that. I just didn’t know it at the time!

        Liked by 2 people

      • archaeopteryx1 says:

        That’s interesting, I/B, I’ve been outside and hands on most of my life (I still need to get out and mow yet this evening), and I never once thought about your god.

        Like

        • “….and I never once thought about your god.”

          Arch, you think about God constantly.In fact, here you are thinking about him right now.

          Liked by 1 person

        • archaeopteryx1 says:

          Actually, I/B, I’m only thinking how gullible someone would have to be, to base their lives on the testimony of anonymous, superstitious, scientifically-ignorant, Bronze and Iron Age men about an invisible entity. People like that buy the Brooklyn Bridge over and over, yet it never changes hands.

          (CS sez: apologies to my friend who the repeats are directed at. I for one, have no interest is saying ‘boo’ to the chatter of Xerox copies. Others can do as they please.)

          Like

  4. SLIMJIM says:

    This post made me appreciate farmers more.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. theancients says:

    I’ve also grown to appreciate farming and gardening because of the great wisdom and truths that lie therein.
    It’s amazing that Jesus would use sowing and reaping in the natural to give us an understanding of what the Kingdom of Heaven is like and also an understanding of the human heart (inner spirit) condition.

    Also the voice of God falls on human hearts like seeds scattered across a field. Some hear the message, but the devil opposes the liberation that would come to them by believing. So he swoops in and steals the message from their hard hearts like birds stealing the seeds from the footpath.

    Others receive the message enthusiastically, but their vitality is short-lived in their shallow hearts. In the heat of temptation, their faith withers, like the seeds that sprouted in gravelly soil.

    The word is deeply rooted in receptive hearts made fertile by uh_oh “manure”, less rocks, less thorns, proving good ground doesn’t just happen; it has to be cultivated

    CS, we all know the rest of the story so I won’t put a post here.
    Many Blessings & thanks much for highlighting an honorable profession.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. archaeopteryx1 says:

    Hey, CS – grab your friends and join us (HERE) ……………we’re having a great time –!

    (EDIT: I have no interest in promoting the mindless chatter of your friend(s) at my expense; I looked at the link, and indeed it is the correct call to dismiss it from this site.)

    Like

  7. Well said, Colorstorm. I actually married a bit of a farm boy and I remember he used to bail hay for a few dollars now and then. Honest hands, a word with integrity, those things are the salt of the earth, indeed. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • ColorStorm says:

      There is a saying that rolls off the tongue and speaks to your emphasis. ‘Integra mens augustissima possessio.’

      You can probably piece it together ms bytes even if you do not know the language. ‘A sound mind is the most majestic possession.’

      So by the grace of God there is quite a premium on a sound mind. ‘Honest hands, and a good word.’ Good for you that you hit the jackpot with a good man, but I bet Mr. says he found a better woman. 😉

      Liked by 1 person

      • archaeopteryx1 says:

        Having studied Latin at length, CS, that’s not what “Integra mens augustissima possessio means, unless one includes broken Latin, the equivalent of “Me Tarzan, you Jane.” Don’t try to show off when you’re so ill-equipped —

        Like

        • ColorStorm says:

          Do you have any purpose other than to seek fault?

          While you may have studied it, I actually spoke it for eight years. So what.

          The translation stands.

          (and btw, people with good manners do not trash gifts sent to friends)

          Like

  8. Citizen Tom says:

    We can romanticize anything. Because of our heritage, we Americans love to romanticize farmers. Should we? I don’t really know, but your post made me think about this passage.

    Genesis 3:17-19 New King James Version (NKJV)

    17 Then to Adam He said, “Because you have heeded the voice of your wife, and have eaten from the tree of which I commanded you, saying, ‘You shall not eat of it’:

    “Cursed is the ground for your sake;
    In toil you shall eat of it
    All the days of your life.

    18 Both thorns and thistles it shall bring forth for you,
    And you shall eat the herb of the field.

    19 In the sweat of your face you shall eat bread
    Till you return to the ground,
    For out of it you were taken;
    For dust you are,
    And to dust you shall return.”

    Our Lord had made Adam His gardener, and what a glorious garden it must have been! My guess is that our Lord cursed the earth so that we would be forced to think upon it, to imagine what it had been like, to consider what we had lost. To grieve and to admire the beauty that remained.

    Are farmers closer to God? Perhaps, if they see their occupation as more than a business. Yet we all have the opportunity to observe the remains of the garden that was. Even in the thick of the city we can find the remains of the garden that was. There are gardeners, people who tend the city. There are plants, both wild and domesticated. There are pets and traces of wild life.

    We call such creatures as rats and roaches vermin, but they are also God’s creations, and they are marvels. In the city, they are survivalists in a place totally unlike where they were intended to be. Cursed though the vermin may be — cursed though the earth may be — God’s creatures still honor Him with their beauty, their energy, and their fascinating ways.

    Is it important to be a farmer, or is it enough to remember God and our place in His plan? Since I am not a farmer, I hope it is the latter. I hope He just wants us to remember that even the manure we produce serves His purpose, that we just need to spread it carefully.
    🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • ColorStorm says:

      I do agree Tom there can be an over exaggeration of just about anything, but none would deny the work ethic that is so missing from today’s youth.

      Certainly the common farmer does not get a free pass to the kingdom of heaven; but I submit he may be able to see it a little easier through harvest or animal husbandry.

      I was careful to include other trades as well, but your point is made well, that it is better to remember the Lord and His plan.

      Love the remark about the manure. 😉
      As usual, good insight, tkx much.

      Like

  9. Elihu says:

    Yes! I love farmers too! There is something about being connected with seasons, harvest and producing food that really grounds a person in reality. I am very thankful for the group of farmers that delivers our produce every week. I don’t know what we’d do without them.

    This was such a well-composed piece!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. ColorStorm says:

    composed or composted 😉

    tkx

    Like

  11. Pingback: My Article Read (11-7-2015) | My Daily Musing

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